Mary Ann Teixeira
San Francisco Peninsula Real Estate

Renovating 728: The Deck

Today on the renovation blog series, we’ll talk about the deck just outside the dining room of this 1949 San Mateo ranch house. As with all posts in this series, I’ll walk you through the area while explaining the changes we made, and why.

The lathe-covered deck, located directly outside the dining room, is a huge bonus for this property. It suggests its use as an additional ‘outdoor room’, or an extension of the home.

The Challenge

The deck itself is redwood, and it was in good condition to begin with. Unfortunately, the lathe-covering was not. There was extensive dry rot damage, so it would have to be replaced, as it was at the end of its useful life. Additionally, the perimeter plants were sparse and anemic. We’d need to make them look lush again.

Our Solution

The effect of an outdoor room was such dramatic feature of the home that we chose not to take down the lathe. Instead, we replaced and patched boards, and painted with fresh paint to match the exterior color of the home. Of course, we asked our pest inspector to inspect and fully disclose the extent of damage first. We also replanted to make the parameter plants look more appealing.

The deck was power-washed and then staged. We chose to stage it as both an outdoor dining area and as an outdoor living room to accentuate the size of the deck. Voila!

Deck After 725_28th_ave_MLS_HID922951_ROOMpatio1


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Renovating 728: The Master Bathroom

Today on the renovation blog series, we’ll talk about the master bathroom in this 1949 San Mateo ranch house. As with all posts in this series, I’ll walk you through the room while explaining the changes we made, and why.

The Challenge

The master bathroom was very cool, for circa 1962. Both the sink and the tub were turquoise blue porcelain. The back wall was lined with a full mirror, the counter was plastic laminate, and the entire area was illuminated with twin swaged glass lamps.

Master Bath Before 1

However, the room was small, and made to feel smaller by the glass and metal shower doors surrounding the tub. It’s not apparent in the photo, but the floor was a dark brown-toned linoleum tile, which didn’t help either.

Our Solution

We had to create a master bathroom that would compliment the grand style of the master bedroom and encourage people to look past its small size. We updated the bath by removing the glass shower doors and re-coating the blue porcelain with crisp, white porcelain. The linoleum floor was replaced with a stylish neutral porcelain tile.

The highest impact was created by replacing the turquoise vanity with a transitional ebony-stained vanity with a Carrera marble counter. The sleek stylishness of the vanity was complimented by replacing the mirror with a framed mirror, lighted by directional stainless halogen fixture.

Master Bath After 3


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Renovating 728: The Master Bedroom

Today on the renovation blog series, we’ll talk about the master bedroom in this 1949 San Mateo ranch house. As with all posts in this series, I’ll walk you through the room while explaining the changes we made, and why.

The master bedroom of this property is actually a ‘master wing’. At one time, the home was extended to add on a large master suite with built in bookcases framing a fireplace, a wall of glass doors facing the yard beyond, and a dedicated bathroom.

The Challenge

The room is large enough to feature as a family room, and its location would have been conducive to that usage. However, we were targeting to sell this property at a price point that would attract a buyer who would want a master suite, so we planned to feature it that way.

Before we began work, the room was paneled in mahogany wood and grass-cloth walls, and the floors were laminate.

Master Before 1

Our Solution

We lightened the walls to reflect the natural light from the windows. This required that we paint over the natural wood paneling as it made the room feel dated and dark. Also, because the floors were laminate and not wood, we wanted to minimize their effect by calling attention to the fireplace area and the beautiful garden.

The large-scale four poster bed dominated the room and suggested grandeur. We created a cozy seating area near the fireplace, transforming the room into a retreat. The neutral colors made the lush green color of the garden the main focus. By softening the room colors and suggesting relaxation with the placement of furniture, we effectively made the room a place where the buyer would want to spend time. Here’s what the room looked like when we were done:

Master After 6 Master After 3


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Renovating 728: The Boys’ Bedroom

Today on the renovation blog series, we’ll talk about the “boys’ bedroom” in this 1949 San Mateo ranch house. As with all posts in this series, I’ll walk you through the room while explaining the changes we made, and why.

The Challenge

This bedroom is large, so it already had a lot of potential. In order to show off the size and suggest its possibilities, we would have to bring it up to date, and make it fresh and bright.

Bedroom Before 2

Our Solution

We removed the wallpaper removed and repainted in a neutral green tone. The carpet was removed and replaced with a natural, warm-toned carpet. We replaced the flush-mount light fixture with a simple yet current-looking fixture. The blinds were removed from the window, and the windows were washed to allow natural light to flood the room.

Bedroom After 3

This freshened-up and pared down presentation allows the room to really shine. With our changes, a potential buyer can easily size of the room and its many possibilities.


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Renovating 728: The Hall Bathroom

Today on my renovation blog series, we’ll talk about the hall bathroom in this 1949 San Mateo ranch house. As with all posts in this series, I’ll walk you through the room while explaining the changes we made, and why.

The Challenge

Everything about the hall bathroom’s style revealed its 66-year-old age. The tile and fixtures were in great condition, but the color and style dated it to its 1949 origins. The original bathroom housed both a bath with hand-held shower and a separate, tiled-in shower stall. The entrance to the shower stall had been walled off, and the shower entrance opened to the adjacent bedroom’s bathroom. Here’s what it looked like originally:

Pink Bathroom Before 1

Pink Bathroom Before 2 Pink Bathroom Before 3

Our Solution

The bathroom was nicely sized for its age, well laid out, and centrally located in the home. There was natural light from a window, and the tile, bath and sink were pristine. One of the most economical solutions to outdated or discolored tile and porcelain fixtures is re-glazing. We refreshed the bathroom with white glazing to the floor, the tub, and the sink. This helped to neutralize the overwhelming pink in the room, and made everything more appealing and clean. Playing off the grey-pink theme, we toned the walls grey. We also replaced the dated wall scones flanking the medicine cabinets, and camouflaged the abandoned shower stall with glass display shelves. Here’s what it looked like when we were finished:

Pink Bathroom After 3

Pink Bathroom After 1


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